Annotation – A Bundle of Open Source Resources for Social Media Data Mining and Analysis

command line graphic of hand tools

We've reached the final annotation in our series on "Social Media Data Collection, Processing, and Use in Research, Marketing, and Political Communication." Toward the end of the project my research drifted from traditional academic sources to investigative journalism. We now veer further off-track into blog posts and GitHub repos. Some videos and a course syllabus on Data Science for Social Systems. Tools, documentation, and related sources that don't fit neatly into any particular box. This isn't so much an annotation as a grab bag of annotated links. I apologize in advance.

Annotation – Technology Firms Shape Political Communication: The Work of Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, and Google With Campaigns During the 2016 U.S. Presidential Cycle

megaphone shouting social media icons

If you ran digital strategy for a presidential campaign, and Facebook came knocking on your door and said "We want to help you win this election," would you turn them down? There's nothing like a little help from the mothership.

Annotation: A 61-Million-Person Experiment in Social Influence and Political Mobilization

Sign saying spread the vote

Finally, a break from annotating technical stuff. Don't get me wrong I like it but...here's where it hits the road: Changes in voting behavior. Here we have a study published in 2012 in Nature on a randomized controlled study of changes in users voting behavior after seeing different versions of messages on Facebook. You want to read this one.

Annotation – Content Marketing Through Data Mining on Facebook Social Network

Gephi software visualization

So far I've been looking at how researchers analyze social media networks, and perform tasks like opinion or sentiment analysis to understand how people feel and think about various subjects and entities. With this annotation we're looking at a thing called content marketing, where influential users of a social network are first identified, then used to spread messages to their network of influence. Even in a huge network, a little bit of leverage in the right places can move products, and perhaps elections.